Bronchial asthma.

Bronchial asthma. Definition.

Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways which can lead to attacks of breathlessness. The respiratory problems with asthma are caused by narrowing of the respiratory tract (bronchial obstruction). Bronchial asthma is evident through bronchial hypersensitivity (hyperreactivity). This means that a multiplicity of irritants such as emissions, smoke or perfume can trigger symptoms such as coughing or breathlessness. Narrowing of the airways and the associated degree of breathlessness can vary considerably in intensity. Typically with bronchial asthma especially in the beginning phase of the illness the narrowing of the airways (obstruction) can usually be completely reversed with drug therapy. Especially with infections, the main symptoms of coughing and breathlessness are associated with tough mucous resistance of the airways. In such a case asthma takes a turn for the worse (exacerbation).

 

Bronchial asthma is very widespread.

Bronchial asthma is a widespread disease: Six percent of all adults in Germany are affected by it. In spite of treatment options with medication, which have continually improved in the last few years, the problem of asthma is still by and large unresolved. It is particularly important to recognise the condition early and to treat it systematically.

 

Is there an early warning system?

Infection-induced deterioration in asthma is almost always exclusively triggered by viral infections. Only rarely do bacterial infections cause such an exacerbation. With careful monitoring you can detect in good time the symptoms which point to an exacerbation. The first signs of an infection-induced deterioration in asthma may be:

  • general symptoms of a cold 
  • increased coughing with yellow sputum
  • needing to take your medication more often with shorter and reduced efficacy of in the sprays, which widen the airways (so-called Betamimetics)
  • increased shortness of breath, especially during exercise.

The start of an infection-induced exacerbation is typically a classic cold, which &-as those affected often describe it &- starts in the nose and then "slips downwards".

 

Controlled asthma as the prime objective.

Today there are modern and highly-effective drugs available to treat asthma effectively, which in most cases with the correct application and good monitoring of treatment means that asthmatics with a well-adjusted drug regimen should be able to control their everyday routine and lead an active and normal life. To achieve such so-called controlled asthma however, means that discriminating diagnostics are needed before the resulting drug regimen can be introduced. In this connection it is important to provide intensive training and motivation to give asthmatics affected their own competency needed to achieve this. Since bronchial asthma can generally be a disease which varies considerably throughout the year, it is applicable for trained asthmatics to adjust treatment measures in each case to the changing circumstances of their condition, in order to permanently or at least for the most part achieve the control they need over their asthma.

 

Therapies

Controlled asthma as the prime objective.

Therapies

Everyday life

How can you live better when you have bronchial asthma?

Everyday life

 

Specialised Clinics

Experience makes us stand out when it comes to the treatment of Bronchial asthma.

Specialised Clinics